Laparoscopy

Laparoscopy

Laparoscopy

In a laparoscopy, a fibre optic tube (laparoscope) is used to examine the inside of the abdomen and pelvis in cases of e.g. endometriosis, pelvic infection, unexplained pelvic or abdominal pain, infertility, and suspected tumours or cancers. A laparoscopy is also done to perform some surgical procedures such as removing a small tissue sample from the liver (liver biopsy) or ovaries (ovarian biopsy), removing the gall bladder, or tubal ligation (sterilisation by “tying” the fallopian tubes). A laparoscopy is done under general anaesthetic. A small cut is made in the abdomen, and the laparoscope is passed through this opening. After the insides have been examined, the laparoscope is removed and the cut is closed. Laparoscopy allows for an accurate diagnosis, and is much less invasive than open surgery.

What is it?
A laparoscopy is an examination of the inside of the abdomen and pelvis, using a laparoscope (fibre optic tube).

A laparoscopy is usually performed in hospital.

Why is it done?
A laparoscopy is done to examine the inside of the abdomen and pelvis, as well as to perform surgical procedures in some cases. Common indications include:

  • Endometriosis
  • Pelvic infections (Pelvic Inflammatory Disease)
  • Unexplained abdominal or pelvic pain
  • Infertility
  • Suspected tumours/cancers
  • Liver biopsy (removal of a small tissue sample from the liver)
  • Ovarian biopsy
  • Performing surgical procedures (e.g. removal of gall bladder, tubal ligation)

What happens?

Before – how to prepare
You need to sign a consent form. You need to fast (eat and drink nothing) for 8 hours before the procedure.

During – how the test is done
You will lie on an operating table in an operating theatre. The anaesthetist will administer a general anaesthetic using an injection in your arm and a mask over your nose and mouth. Once you are unconscious, your abdomen is exposed and thoroughly cleaned. A small incision is made, just below your umbilicus usually, and the laparoscope is passed through this opening. Air is often pumped into your abdominal cavity to facilitate easier viewing. The doctor will examine the pelvis and abdomen, noting any abnormalities, as well as performing any surgery. The laparoscope is removed and the incision is sutured closed.

Risks and Compilations
There is a risk of damaging internal organs or blood vessels, which can cause serious problems. These complications are, however, not common.

Special Issues
This procedure is much less invasive than open surgery and allows your doctor to make a very accurate diagnosis in many instances.

Short Description
In a laparoscopy, a fibre optic tube (laparoscope) is used to examine the inside of the abdomen and pelvis in cases of e.g. endometriosis, pelvic infection, unexplained pelvic or abdominal pain, infertility, and suspected tumours or cancers.

Keywords
laparoscopy, pelvic



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