X-ray: Joints

X-ray: Joints

X-ray: Joints

Alternative Names: Knee X-ray, Hip X-ray, Shoulder X-ray, Elbow X-ray

An X-ray of the joints is done to investigate problems (e.g. pain, swelling, or injury) of the knee, hip, shoulder, or elbow joints and their structures. These problems may be caused by arthritis, gout, infections (septic arthritis), dislocations, or broken bones (fractures). An X-ray creates images by using radiation, which passes through the body. On the image, air is black, dense structures (e.g. bone) are white, and there are greys in between. You would normally either lie still on an X-ray table, stand, or sit in a chair while the images are taken.

What is it?
An X-ray uses radiation, passed through the body, to create images. The different body structures appear as black, white, and shades of grey. Air is black, very dense structures (like bone) are white, with a range of greys in between.

An X-ray is performed in a radiology facility although some machines are mobile and can be used in hospital wards and operating theatres. An X-ray usually takes less than an hour to perform.

Why is it done?
It is often done to investigate problems such as:

It is often done to investigate symptoms such as:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Injury

It is often done when considering diagnoses such as:

  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Infections (septic arthritis
  • Dislocations
  • Fractures (broken bones)

What happens?

Before – how to prepare
No special preparation is needed although all jewellery and other metal objects should be removed.

During – how the test is done
You will either lie on an X-ray table, stand, or sit in a chair. You will be asked to move into certain positions and then remain very still while the X-rays are taken. There is no discomfort at all.

After the test
The results will be available a short time after the X-ray has been taken – usually an hour or so, depending on how quickly the radiologist is able to look at, and interpret, the images.

Risks and Compilations
There is a small risk associated with the radiation involved but most experts do not consider this to be a significant problem.

Short Description
An X-ray of the joints is done to investigate problems (e.g. pain, swelling, or injury) of the knee, hip, shoulder, or elbow joints and their structures.

Keywords
x-ray of joints, knee X-ray, hip X-ray, shoulder X-ray, elbow X-ray



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