Hysterosalpingogram

Hysterosalpingogram

Hysterosalpingogram

Alternative Names: HSG

A hysterosalpingogram (HSG) takes X-ray images of the uterus and fallopian tubes in cases where there are suspected tumours, infertility, and recurrent pelvic/abdominal pain. A catheter (thin tube) is guided through the cervix into the uterus. A dye, which shows up on the X-ray, is injected through the catheter, and X-rays are taken. You should not have had sexual intercourse for 24 hours before the test or have any pelvic infections; your bowels and bladder should be empty. Possible risks include pelvic infection, rupture of the uterus, and allergic reaction to the dye.

What is it?
A hysterosalpingogram (HSG) is an X-ray technique, where special radio-opaque dye is injected into the uterus, through the cervix, and X-ray images of the uterus and uterine/fallopian tubes are taken.

An HSG is performed in a radiology facility and takes approximately an hour.

Why is it done?
An HSG is done to assess the anatomy of the uterus and uterine/fallopian tubes. Common indications include:

  • Suspected tumours
  • Infertility
  • Recurrent pelvic/abdominal pain

What happens?

Before – how to prepare
You will need to sign a consent form. You should avoid sexual intercourse for 24 hours prior to the procedure. The test should NOT be done if you are menstruating at the time, or if you have any pelvic infections. It is best for your bowels to be empty and so you may be given laxatives and/or enemas the day before the test is done. You will be more comfortable if you empty your bladder before the procedure.

During – how the test is done
You will need to undress from the waist down. You will lie on your side with your knees drawn up to your chest and a speculum (a device that holds the vagina open so the doctor can see the cervix) is inserted into your vagina. The doctor will then place a catheter (thin tube) through the cervix and into the uterus. Dye, which shows up on X-ray, is injected through the catheter and X-rays are taken. You may be asked to move into certain positions while these X-rays are taken.

After the test
You may have some abdominal discomfort, but it is not usually very severe.

Risks and Compilations
Risks include:

  • Pelvis infection
  • Rupture of the uterus
  • Allergic reaction to the radio-opaque dye

Short Description
A hysterosalpingogram (HSG) takes X-ray images of the uterus and fallopian tubes in cases where there are suspected tumours, infertility, and recurrent pelvic/abdominal pain.

Keywords
hysterosalpingogram, HSG



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