Intravenous Pyelogram

Intravenous Pyelogram

Intravenous Pyelogram

Alternative Names: IVP

An Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) is an X-ray technique that is used to examine the kidneys and urinary tract, in cases where there is blood in the urine, suspected kidney stones, injuries, obstructed urine flow, and suspected polycystic kidney disease and tumours. Your bowels should be empty for the test. An initial X-ray is taken. Then dye is injected into a vein in your arm. Over the next few hours, more X-rays are taken. A final X-ray is taken to make sure that all the dye has passed through the urinary tract. The only possible risk is an allergic reaction to the dye.

What is it?
An Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) is an X-ray technique that uses injected radio-opaque dye to examine the kidneys and urinary tract.

An IVP is done in a radiology facility and takes approximately 2-4 hours to perform, although in cases of obstruction (where urine flow is obstructed) X-rays may be taken 12-24 hours later.

Why is it done?
An IVP is done to examine the kidneys and urinary tract. Common indications include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Suspected kidney stones
  • Injuries/trauma
  • Obstructed urine flow
  • Suspected polycystic kidney disease
  • Suspected kidney tumours

What happens?

Before – how to prepare
You need to sign a consent form. You may not eat or drink anything (nil per mouth) for 6-8 hours prior to the test. Your bowels should be clear prior to the test and so you may be given a laxative or enema. All jewellery or other metal items need to be removed.

During – how the test is done
You lie on an X-ray table and an initial X-ray will be taken. The dye will then be injected into a vein in your arm (this may be a little painful). Sequential, timed X-rays are then taken over the next few hours, after which you are asked to empty your bladder. A further X-ray is taken to make sure that all the dye has passed through the urinary tract.

After the test
You may have headaches as well as nausea and vomiting, but these symptoms are not common or, should they occur, severe.

Risks and Compilations
The only significant risk is an allergic reaction to the dye, although it is important to make sure that all the dye is passed through the urinary tract – any dye that remains can cause serious problems.

Short Description
An Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP) is an X-ray technique that is used to examine the kidneys and urinary tract, in cases where there is blood in the urine, suspected kidney stones, injuries, obstructed urine flow, and suspected polycystic kidney disease and tumours.

Keywords
Intravenous Pyelogram, IVP, kidney x-ray



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